Monthly Archives: March 2017

Controlling the narrative vs. free speech

Last Friday’s WSJ had a piece entitled The ‘Postmodern’ Intellectual Roots of Today’s Campus Mobs, in which Crispin Sartwell writes, “If reality is nothing but a ‘narrative,’ then of course it’s important to control what people say.” We are witnessing the … Continue reading

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Inverting, not dismantling, the hierarchies of power

Long but great article “On Political Correctness” in The American Scholar. Let us eschew the familiar examples: the disinvited speakers, the Title IX tribunals, the safe zones stocked with Play-Doh, the crusades against banh mi. The flesh-eating bacterium of political correctness, … Continue reading

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Proselytizing gets tiresome, no matter who is doing it

In Monastaries of the Mind, Victor Davis writes that “When everything is politicized, people retreat into mental mountaintops — dreams of the past and fantasies of the future.” An increasing number of American don’t take all this [the perpetual proselytizing … Continue reading

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U.S. Grant on safe spaces

Over at Ricochet, member “Gumby Mark” draws an interesting analogy: Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant, written as he was dying, is one of the finest memoirs by a senior Civil War officer (the other is Fighting for the Confederacy by … Continue reading

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The latest reincarnation of Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s “general will?”

Kevin D. Williamson wonders if we’re getting a little Rousseau mixed into the current Trumpian version of populism, even though we on the Right tend to think poorly of the 18th century Genevan philosopher: “Anglo-American” is a term with a … Continue reading

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Sounds good, doesn’t work

Victor Davis Hanson writes that “The dream of a therapeutic utopia without punishment for wrongdoing fails in practice.” Deterrence is the strategy of persuading someone in advance not to do something, often by raising the likelihood of punishment. But in … Continue reading

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A legacy that will prevail?

Assessing a presidency requires some cure time, some time for the rawness of recently-completed political battles to fade and for the historians (who may have been part of those battles) to establish sufficient viewing distance. That doesn’t mean everyone does … Continue reading

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